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's what. the consumer report for educational technology health insurancing the energy around the world develop better tool for teachers. i think the panelists got it right in terms what we're trying to do. a few points that we're thinking about first the issue about power. who controls it? the person who controls the platform will have a enormous platform. we need to be careful. we are going to be careful about conflict of interest. we're not going to allow anyone to make investments in educational technology companies. consumer reports have a great online of the interest rules. they don't take free samples, for example. we're going to have the circles in place to make sure that we're not biasing the test result and the rutlez. when you do that the swhoal system falls apart. that's something we're talking about. the second thing we brought up is about equity. it's an important issue when you're thinking about technology in the classroom, the issue around the digital dwoid. one thing we're happy with is the ability to pick up what we call energy treatment effects. that's the worry one t
energy capital of, of the united states. and that's why i think we need to do everything we can to bolster tourism because it's still the backbone of our economy. when it comes to issues that effect the state of nevada, our delegation has worked very, very well together. let me give you an example. yucca mountain. it doesn't matter what party you're in, what side of the aisle. the fact of the matter is that the nevada delegation stood fast when it came to protecting the people of the state of nevada from acquiring nuclear waste from the rest of the country. i think that's one good example. when it comes to other things, i worked very closely and across the aisle with people every day when it comes to our support for israel, when we insure that the iranians don't acquire nuclear weapons, and i think i would work with anybody to make sure that we got our economy back on track, to get our budget under control and we end wasteful spending. >> moderator: okay, thank you. senator heller? heller: rick, thanks for the question. i appreciate the opportunity to talk about something i thin
to we want to have energy diversity and efficiency and limit the emissions put into the environment. and that policy is in complemented by a series of subsidies and or tax relief and or credit, however you want to think about it, to encourage that policy. we, as citizens, get paid or get a tax credit for write-off of driving the fuel efficient and electric car, right? you get to go on the high occupancy vehicle lane with an electric car. it's an incentive to buy a fuel efficient and or a car that meets the energy policy of the country. as citizens we also get a tax write-off if we buy fuel efficient windows and heating and cooling systems. businesses like the potomac and others that are probably in the room today they also get tax write-offs for buying and installing energy-efficient fuel efficient, lower emission heating and cooling systems, windows etc and their businesses and adopting more green policies and diversified energy policies. and then third, for those businesses to try to encourage innovations again there's a 17% tax credit for research and development for a new techno
e banks and e commerce riding on the intrntd. we're moving toward a future of having the energy distribution on a smart grid connect requested internets. we're moving to a generation of next generation aviation and air traffic controller that's controlled by the internet and over the internet. and so we have moved so much of our essential servicings on to the internet and one has to ask, is that what it was designed for? and is it secure for what we need for in the future? this brings about three tensions i'm going try to stick to three. so three tensions that we're seeing in the policy world. and three tensions that we've seen in the technology world. the first is we're seeing a tension from the need from the economic policy to stimulate the economy versus the demands for national security. ict and the economic growth that the internet commerce of our country is measured nearly 4% gdp growth. that's the smallst in the nation right now. that's what the g20 countries are expecting. developing nations are expecting the ict and the e economy to contribute to as much as 10% of the g
, regulatory, and energy policies to get the country ascending again. >> a one minute rebuttal. >> it's demeaning to suggest issues with women are just social and not economic. they are economic issues. the status of the relationship, if they can't have a relationship recognized, inability to get insurance policy, inability to get other benefits, less favorable tax treatment, that's an economic issue. with respect to women, if you force women to have an ultrasound procedure against their will and pay for it, that's an economic issue. if you deny women the opportunity because of personhood legislation, to make constitutional choices, even including whether to purchase contraception, that's an economic issue. when george allen was in congress, he repeated voted against family medical leave act. he's supported the blunt amendment to enable employers to take away contraceptive coverage for their employees. these are women's issues, but they are bigger than that. they are family issues, and they are economic issues, and it's demeaning to suggest the little social issues we don't need to sp
? >> i thought the convention was fantastic. but the there was an energy on the ground. in terms of what i have learned and experienced in the last year-and-a-half, it truly has been -- the biggest thing in terms of our primary is that it was really a testament to the grassroots. in any other cycle, what happened in the republican primary could not have happened. in any ordinary year, the should have been a very easy lay down. we were out-spent three-one. when we started, i was a 2%. >> the primaries back in march. you may not be sitting here. >> thank god for small miracles. >> you published an opinion piece in "the wall street *" this week where you say that america is that a crisis point. can you explain that to? >> i think we are at a fiscal and economic cliff. i think we have pursued government spending programs that have created a debt that is out of control. at the convention come after talking, i went home to my hotel at 1:30 a.m. and i was looking on my iphone at twitter. and the comedian paula pound stone had sent a tweet that evening. i don't know her, but she said " ted cruz
, talk about the energy department, faa, to expand the regulations? or maybe what you're talking about offer more incentives, insurance has been discussed, federal, earning more federal contracts if you keep your systems up to a certain level security. >> indemnity on pc would be of benefit to industry, to be able to have that capability if they comply with a risk-based standards. and that's really what we're talking about. when we look at breaching of data, for instance, in our team, and verizon can we as a process called evidence-based risk management. so it's not what we think is out the. it's what we actually identify and then what we can correct. so if we take that type of approach between government and industry and not try to gold plate everything and have the perfect network, but have a risk-based management approach that says i can assume risk at this certain level based on the consequences of a breach, then we could put programs and policies in place that enable security as opposed to inhibit security. >> i think that organizations are looking for guidance and standards but i
of president obama in the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2083 question of transparency in the good government we all envision. from my hit by 2010, that energy had dissipated. a lot of efforts had gone towards a lot of things and we were seen the dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize and imagine knowing that the power of data is, but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work and i will describe here that results in some greeting. grading is a cool cruel art. what i did is look at the problem of lacking transparency. it looked to me like maybe the transparency community had communicated well enough what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone out there that didn't have direction or designation. so i sat down to some technical people. i am a lawyer, so i have to go back and learned about how these computers work, talking to each other on the internet in things like that. i sat down with them data people to interpret and language that policymakers could understand what it was the data people need and in a paper that most of you
. that is not momentum. i bring fresh ideas and energy and a fresh set of ideas and i want azeri to join me in getting missouri back to work. >> moderator: jim higgins? higgins: $24 billion. that is what the budget for missouri will be next year. the state income tax money, some of it comes from the fed, but it is $24 billion of other people's tax money sitting in the city. we have a problem with the revolving door where the legislature when the term is up the turnaround and become lobbyists. why do we have the problem? $24 million of other people's tax money. the major problem spends millions of dollars on their campaigns. why is that? why did people contribute millions of dollars to their campaign? because whoever wins will have control of the $24 billion. of other people's tax money. the special-interest groups spend a lot of energy and resources. you know, school administrators, special-interest groups, contractors, corporations, they all spent a lot of time and effort trying to influence the registry church to get back to $24 billion it's a waste of time it's a big game to everybody except the ta
to economic success, and reform in non-budgetary areas such as health care, energy, immigration, k-12 education, and so much else. there are, as you know, enormous policy differences in all of these areas, but substantively they could be bridged to move forward effectively in each area. however, that will only happen if our elected officials are in the final analysis committed to effective governance. and that means working across party lines, different opinions, to make lyrically tough decisions. and that takes us to today's program. any strategy for the long-term success of the american economy must focus on k-12 education in today's highly competitive global economy. there's an enormous amount of activity, as all of you know, going on in that area. and with the purpose of contributing to that activity, the hamilton project has conducted two events on k-12 education with papers and panel discussions, and today is her third event. let me outline a program but first let me strongly recommend the paper that is in your folders entitled the dozen facts about k-12 education. paper present
there and market share in the united states of america. so trade is essential, and i was focused much energy as i could on trade. at the same time, there are things you have to do before you can really get a solid trading relationship. do you have corporate commercial law and according to economic system so that it that this will become -- and the capital is safe? do you have democratic courts so that there is recourse of law, if any problems arising trade? this has been a major problem, some of the emerging countries of europe, the russians still don't quite understand the law with respect to trade. so trade is important, but there are other needs that countries have. we can help a great deal and they are receptive to reverse institutions here in the united states to help organize courts, helping organize elections, help them organize legislative bodies. i think we have to work very hard to see if we can help them with her education systems. one of the great deficiencies throughout the world, especially indiana states as well, but in that part of the work is educating youngsters for 21st century
we have a number of publications outside that we study all of them. energy security, nuclear security, climate change, american competitiveness, asymmetric terrorism among others. so i would encourage you to go on the web site and look at them and see how we take it from the perspective we put it in there. we put out the facts. we don't balance it one way or the other. today we are so pleased to have rose here. let me lay out a few ground rules as you can tell c-span is here and they are going to analyze it for us. rose will get up and talk for 15 or 20 minutes i presume and then we will have a q&a to lend dignity but would otherwise be i will choose who will speak and we will have a microphone over on that side of the room so you will have to come over and queue up to the microphone. when you ask a question please identify yourself and try to keep it a little bit short. we are here to listen to rose and not necessarily to you. if you would do that we can get as many people and as we can. most of the familiar with rose speed integration is designated as the undersecretary for arms con
in the energy on the tax structure of the deal more than economic merits of the investor. frequently investors to these sophisticated product offers would boast about the money they save on taxes. seldom did they throw out the rate of return from the deal. occasionally they screamed when they had to recapture taxes. my goals and the goals of the firms and individuals are worked with are simple. make money by leveraging the creativity, talent and passion of on for mores. tax rates are part of the landscape. we are looking to leverage talent, not tax breaks. we manage risks, not the tax code. preferential tax rate for capital gains and dividendss are windfall for wealthy investors. in my view the special tax treatment is neither fair nor equitable more available to any other professional endeavour. gifted teacher who is inspiring and challenging our children and enriching human capital gets no such special treatment. i would caution members of the joint committee to be skeptical when people like me to testify to you. that we give lip service to the idea of the level playing field. we make campai
as important for the nation's economy. it reduces fuel burn, saves energy, and improves the environment. implementing this improves the efficiency and safety of aviation while adding jobs and strengthening our economy. the case for next generation has been and continues to be compelling. i would, again, like to thank you, mr. chairman, ranking member costello, and the committee for hosting the panel today. i look forward to any questions you might have. thank you, again, sir. >> thank you. mr. renadli. >> thank you, mr. chairman, members of the subcommittee, thank you for holding this hearing today. it's a catch all phrase over the last ten years that means everything to everybody in the aviation community. we are proud to be involvedded in the essential stake holder in nextgen development and participates in the advisory committee which mr. barger spoke of. the committee has done an outstanding job of simpling the elevator speech of what nextgen is. using satellite technology, reducing carbon emissions, using best technology to reduce voice community cations or voice saturation on fr
its nuclear facilities under the inspection regime of the international atomic energy agency. at the same time we emphasize on the stipulations of the nuclear nonproliferation treaty which we can give rights of all states to acquire nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. mr. president, the insistence of the united states and countries of the european union and others to impose unilateral economic measures violate, violates the regulations of international law on the principles of free trade, and raises questions about the legality and morality of such practices. based on this, we call for lifting the embargo imposed on cuba by the united states for decades. we also renew our call for lifting and stopping all unilateral coercive measures imposed on the peoples of other countries, such as venezuela, belarus, iran, syria and the democratic people's republic of korea. mr. president, our aspiration to achieve a positive reform of the international organization stems from our desire to find a world based on justice, security and prosperity for all the peoples of the world, away
to vote, do so, but that energy needs to be put into social movements in which we demand on our own terms what we want and need in our own lives rather than putting face to an elected official and crossing fingers in hopes they do what we want, and for an example, the students in quebec on strike for months because there was a proposed tuition hike which they said was unacceptable. they said we will not pay. we're going to be in the streets until you get rid of the hikes. they tried to make protests illegal. what's come of this? the tuition hike did not go through, and the law for bidding protests was appealed. >> again, please ask a specific question. >> i know. it's terrible. my question, i suppose, would be what do you see as the value for social movements of political change. >> thank you. >> thank you very much for that example. i think, hopefully, folks realize the reason i was asked to testify before members of congress was because of my work on such a social movement. there was students on our campus who organized collectively to address this concern with our insurance and who saw
's about 99% of the people. why? because the electricity prices for the cap-and-trade energy tax that tim has supported would cost skyrocketing electricity and affect our technology community. people are paying $30 more every time you fill up compared to january of 2000. so if you like high gas prices, but if you want more affordable. and i want to allow us in virginia to produce oil and natural gas off our coast and use those royalties for roads and transportation. that would be the first bill i would introduce as your center. if people want a job, our approach is create more job opportunities for people. and whether it is young people are middle-aged folks, 20% of the folks in the country or underemployed or unemployed. we need to turn it around so i respectfully ask for your support, talk to your associates, friends, neighbors. let them know. if they use electricity, drive a car, want a job, or care about the future of the families they ought to join the alan t. go to our website, and most important i look forward to making sure that america is ascending once again and is a land of opp
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17

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